Call for papers : A Colllection on the meaning of transformation in South Africacial Recent blog posts

Call for papers : A Colllection on the meaning of transformation in South Africacial

CALL FOR PAPERS Quality Transformation – Meaning and Evaluation Edited by Alon Serper and Keyan Tomaselli The aim of the collection is to produce a clear, concrete and meaningful definition of the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ by way of an interdisciplinary, dialectical and critical engagement with and enquiry into the meanings of these terms by different authors from various disciplines, universities and areas of practice. Authors from different disciplines, universities and areas of practice inquire into the concrete meanings of the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’. These authors include economists, natural and life scientists, sociologists, psychologists, environmentalists, anthropologists, innovators, politicians, philosophers, development study experts, human rights experts, educators, historians, political scientists and lawyers from the academy and different organisations. They reflect on their fields and their practice in it, and account for what these terms mean to them, how they think these terms should be approached, conceptualised, studied, evaluated and summoned up, and how these terms have been engaged with in their disciplines and in general. The authors also account for what these terms do not mean for them, and how these terms should not be approached, studied, assessed and summoned up. They look at the hindrances and mistakes that have been done in their fields and disciplines in regard to transformation and quality transformation, and how they can amend and solve them. They produce insights for public dialogue, debate and discussion on and methodological engagement with the type of transformation South Africa and the world need and how to achieve it, and what should and should not be done for the construction of a constructive and quality transformation in South Africa and elsewhere. The main rationale for producing this collection is that the linguistic term ‘transformation’ has become manipulated, overused, confused, abstracted, and non-problematised in South Africa. It was turned into an empty abstraction, at best, and a void and meaningless linguistic utterance and sign, at worst. The word ‘transformation’ is mentioned and reiterated repeatedly in public meetings and speeches, political discourse, and meetings between administrators and management and their staff and employees until it lost real meaning. The collection aims to address and amend this situation by critically engaging with, problematising, deconstructing, debating and reconstructing the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ and producing real, concrete, meaningful and focused meanings into them and definitions of them. Required length: 5000 to 12000 words For more details please emails Alon.Serper@Nmmu.ac.za Please send abstracts and drafts to Alon Serper at Alon.Serper@Nmmu.ac.za

The book aims to contribute to the empowerment of South Africans and the development of all areas of South Africa and the life of its people – the economy, the environment, education, science, wellbeing and quality of life, innovation, and technology, citizenship and human rights. The book does so through working at producing a clear, concrete and meaningful definition of the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ by way of an interdisciplinary, dialectical and critical engagement with and enquiry into the meanings of these terms by different authors from various disciplines, universities and areas of practice. The collection intends as a lever for a dialectical and interdisciplinary dialogue and debate on ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ - specifically in South Africa. It endeavours to redefine clear boundaries for research and debate into these terms, set these terms apart and differentiate them from other related terms. It also aims to enable critical and constructive engagement with the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ in theory, practice, and praxis that interrelates practice and theory. It seeks to enable a critical reflection, enquiry and co-reflection into what has been and needs to be done in different areas in South Africa since the first democratic elections in South Africa in April,1994. The term ‘transformation’ is used in South Africa to qualify and define where the new, post-apartheid, South Africa is presently located in relation to its grim past as an oppressing racist minority White domination of the non-White majority past, and its goals and intentions for its future as a participative, inclusive, democracy of all its people in dignity, equality, fulfilment and empowerment. It is also used to evaluate where South Africans and South Africa have been, are, and where South Africans want themselves and their country to be in terms of empowerment, development, welfare and welllbeing. ‘Quality transformation’ means a high standard transformation and what transformation should be. The terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ are also used for and in the assessment of different areas of life, research, policies and practices in the new South Africa that are vital for the development of the country and the improvement of the quality of life and empowerment of South Africans. This is including the focal areas of: Knowledge generation and human capital development in response to the needs of South Africa and the African continent; The promotion of democracy, human rights and responsible citizenship; Innovation and capacity building in science and technology; Education and learning, and, Economic and environmental sustainability. Clarifying these terms of ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ and their meanings is used for policy makings and evaluation using empirical means and clear criteria, standards, definitions and meanings. The collection identities, analyses and reevaluates mistakes that have been made in these different focal areas. It suggests ways of solving problems and hindrances in these areas in the attempts to summon up transformation and quality transformation. It criticises decisions, practices, social interactions and policies made in the areas, disciplines, fields and practices it discusses. It explores and argues ways of amending things, summing up a more quality transformation. It critically engages with various theories regarding ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ in the different disciplines and fields, as well as the implementation of these theories. Authors from different disciplines, universities and areas of practice inquire into the concrete meanings of the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’. These authors include economists, natural and life scientists, sociologists, psychologists, environmentalists, anthropologists, innovators, politicians, philosophers, development study experts, educators, historians, political scientists and lawyers from the academy and different organisations. They reflect on their fields and their practice in it, and account for what these terms mean to them, how they think these terms should be approached, conceptualised, studied, evaluated and summoned up, and how these terms have been engaged with in their disciplines and in general. The authors also account for what these terms do not mean for them, and how these terms should not be approached, studied, assessed and summoned up. They look at the hindrances and mistakes that have been done in their fields and disciplines in regard to transformation and quality transformation, and how they can amend and solve them. They produce insights for public dialogue, debate and discussion on and methodological engagement with the type of transformation South Africa and the world need and how to achieve it, and what should and should not be done for the construction of a constructive and quality transformation in South Africa and elsewhere. The book uses the dialectical underpinning, of using enquiry, questions and answers, heuristic problem solving, contradictions, dialogue, critical reflection, and constructive tension for transformation and the construction of an improvement and expansion on what was there before, to work out a clear, rigorous and complete interdisciplinary definition and analysis of ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ for those who are interested in it and in further dialoguing, defining and debating it. It constructs this definition by dialectically interrelating different insights of various practitioners and theorists that could be contradictory. It is dialectically creating from the various inputs a clear and meaningful definition of ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ that is holistic and based on the Gestalt of the whole being greater than the sums of its parts, and more complete and rigorous than what was there before. The main rationale for producing this collection is that the linguistic term ‘transformation’ has become manipulated, overused, confused, abstracted, and non-problematised in South Africa. It was turned into an empty abstraction, at best, and a void and meaningless linguistic utterance and sign, at worst. The word ‘transformation’ is mentioned and reiterated repeatedly in public meetings and speeches, political discourse, and meetings between administrators and management and their staff and employees until it lost real meaning. The mass media, politicians, leaders, managers, administrators and those in power turn ‘transformation’ into a vague and mysterious word that can bear numerous different meanings and means of determining its meaning and that is not challenged and critically engaged with. They do this to maintain their popularity and power. The collection aims to address and amend this situation by critically engaging with, problematising, deconstructing, debating and reconstructing the terms ‘transformation’ and ‘quality transformation’ and producing real, concrete, meaningful and focused meanings into them and definitions of them. The authors include . The chapter structure is as follows X science scientist Y economy economist Z political science R – law lawyer
 
Posted by Alon Serper on 10 July 2016 13:40:32


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